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Why you need to HURRY UP and get on with your content

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by in Podcasting
Why you need to get on with your podcast content | PodSchool Podcast

Your listeners are busy people so you need to hurry it up!

Today I’m going to do a bit of whip cracking!

If you’re one of those podcasters who likes to take their time warming up or faffing about with your co-host before you get into the meat and potatoes of your content may I ask you, ever so politely, to please stop.

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Why do we do it?

Often, if you’re new to presenting, this can be more about nerves than anything else but sometimes, in the worst cases, it’s got nothing to do with nerves and everything to do with ego.  Like the show I recently heard, where one of the hosts stopped down halfway through the intro to have a snack and chew right into the microphone.  WTF?

Your listeners are busy people and if you ever want to grow an audience outside of your inner circle of mates, you’re going to have to offer up the kind of show that can compete with the other high-quality stuff out there.

But don’t you need to warm up the audience?

The simple answer is no because they’re coming to you as warm as they possibly could be.

If someone has your show in their ears, they’ve pressed play and are expecting to be taken right into the depths of your content, so take them there.

The more you faff about the more opportunity you give them to turn off because you’re not giving them anything they can latch onto.  You’re also making it look like you think your time is more precious than theirs.

People are time poor. They have a lot of options for entertainment and it’s important to get to the good stuff as soon as possible.

Having a snack or asking your co-host, “so what did you get up to today?” for no reason apart from filling time, isn’t entertaining.

If you feel you need time with your co-host to warm up that’s fine.  Just record it and scrap it so your listeners don’t have to hear it.

Less is always more

When your show wraps up you want your audience to think “It’s over already?”

You don’t want them to ever think, “Will these idiots just get on with it?!”

The stats show the majority of people don’t make it through 15 minutes of most podcasts so if you’re doing a one hour show and you haven’t gotten to the meaty bits by minute 20 your audience isn’t going to stick around waiting for you to get to the point.

What about getting new listeners up to speed?

If you’re conscious of setting up the premise of your show for new listeners that’s fine but it doesn’t need to take 15 minutes.  In fact, you should be able to sum it up in a quick line during your recorded or live intro.

I have this in the voiceover that leads into both my podcasts so I can get on with the content.

For my interview series, You’ve Gotta Start Somewhere the intro line is “the podcast that goes behind the scenes of show business to prove there’s no such thing as an overnight success.”  Putting that at the start of each episode sets up the premise quickly and leaves me to dive straight into the show.

Listen to the intro to You’ve Gotta Start Somewhere…

In each episode you’ll be catering to new AND old listeners so you don’t want to drive regular listeners crazy by repeating yourself and a quick line at the start of each episode can bring newbies up to speed while keeping your regulars onside.

At the end of the day your show should be about your listeners, not you, so get to the good stuff as quickly as you can and they’ll love you for it.

Right! Whip cracking over!

Got a burning question you’d like answered on the podcast? Send me an email.

Need some help getting started or setting up your home studio?  Download my free podcasting guide.

Got some time on your hands? Read the full episode transcript

[00:00:00] Hello and welcome to the show. Today I'm going to do a bit of whip cracking. If you're one of those people who takes a long time to get into the meat and potatoes of your podcast content, may I ask you politely, to please stop.
One thing I notice a lot with podcasts that don't end up going anywhere is that they waffle and waffle and waffle. Sometimes if you are new to presenting, this can be a nervous thing or alternatively you can be doing it to warm up. Either yourself or your audience. But your audience are already pressing play and they want to listen to your show so you don't have to warm them up.
People are time poor. They have a lot of options for content and entertainment and it is really important that you get to the crux of what you're doing right off the bat. If you need some warm up time with your co-host that is 100 percent fine. Just record it and then scrap it or record it and then start the show proper and just edit out that front bit where you were wasting time. Less is always always always going to be more and you want your audience at the end of every episode to think "Oh it's over? I want more already!"

[00:01:33] The stats are show the majority of people don't even make it through 15 minutes of your content and if you're doing an hour show and haven't gotten to the meat of what you're talking about by the 20th minute then your audience is not going to stick around.
Your audience has so much choice and you want to be respectful of their time and make sure you give them what they've come there for really quickly. Usually waffling and getting comfy is more about you and your co-host than it is about your audience and you need to think what is best for the people who are listening to your show.
When it comes to resetting the idea behind your show, which is a good idea because with each new episode there might be new listeners, it can be done in one simple sentence. At the beginning of most of my shows I have a tag line for the episode that explains to the audience what the show is about e.g. with You've Gotta Start Somewhere, my tag line is "the podcast that goes behind the scenes of show business to prove there's no such thing as an overnight success." Saying that at the beginning of each episode means I don't need to explain what that is.
You should be able to do a super quick elevator pitch in that introduction to get new listeners up to speed and then get into your show.
It is a tough market out there and it is a lot easier to fail as a podcast than it is to succeed. So to give yourself the best chance of success you really have to prove to an audience that they're not going to be wasting their time by coming to your show. Every single show needs to be presented like it's the very first time and that means not getting self-indulgent or complacent but really giving your best content upfront and really quickly. So your listener can get into it and s/he's never thinking "Oh can they just hurry up. I've got better things to do with my time!"

[00:04:28] So there you go. I hope you found this episode helpful. If you are enjoying the shows please head to iTunes and leave a review so other people can find it and if you would like a little bit more handholding in creating your own podcast then head to podschoolpodcast.com or you'll find a link to my online podcasting course PodSchool. That's it from me. I will see you next week and until then, happy podcasting.

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WANT TO START A PODCAST BUT HAVE NO IDEA HOW? THIS GUIDE TAKES YOU THROUGH ALL THE TOOLS AND TECH YOU NEED TO GET GOING!

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